Sunday, 21 June 2009

Perception

Tens of thousands of years ago early man was in touch with his environment from the lay of the land to what types of berries can kill and the locations best for hunting. This was all achieved through repetition, trial and error and subconsious learning. In todays modern world we rely on screens to tell us what to do and where to go. I hope to look into soloutions that can inform people about what there local suroundings have to offer but instead of usings tradtional signage and screens. As a designer and fan of subliminal learning i want to find ways of using what already exists and modifying it to subtly educate the viewer. For example maps of key tourist areas that are repeat patterns that adorn as many possible surfaces, hopefully the viewer will be absorbing this ambient information and benefiting from it.

4 comments:

Steph-annie said...

can't remember what this is called but long ago they used to cut the landscape into blocks of would. it was a visual map and you had to feel your way over this mini landscape! I'll try and find out the name of it for you

Steph-annie said...

/Users/stephaniefulke/Desktop/Picture 1.png

"wood was, and is, the most distinctive medium used by the Greenland Eskimos in mapmaking. Blocks are carved in relief to represent the rugged coastline of Greenland with its fjords, islands, nunataks and glaciers, the shapes of the various islands being linked together with rods. In order to reduce the size of the blocks, the outline of the coast is carried up one side and down the other. Three-dimensional maps of coastlines were carved of wood as long as three hundred years ago. These Inuit charts were usually carved from driftwood and are made to be felt rather than looked at. The Inuit hold this map under their mittens and feel the contours with their fingers to discern patterns in the coastline. The land is very abstract. It is limited to “edges” that can be felt on a dark night in a kayak. Since they are made of wood they are impervious to the weather, and will float if they are dropped overboard accidentally. It will also last longer that one that is printed."http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://spacecollective.org/userdata/W3rK0uDX/1202738775/greenland_carved_wood_map_reversed.gif&imgrefurl=http://spacecollective.org/mslima/3220/Inuit-Wood-Maps&usg=__Oi0bJNdNxfMQJCE9nEJb_-QzL34=&h=304&w=152&sz=23&hl=en&start=31&um=1&tbnid=PasCN11IpwXE0M:&tbnh=116&tbnw=58&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dinuit%2Bmaps%26ndsp%3D18%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26start%3D18%26um%3D1

couldn't find the name but here's an image and describtion

Steph-annie said...

whoops the image didn't work

Steph-annie said...

http://spacecollective.org/userdata/W3rK0uDX/1202738775/greenland_carved_wood_map_reversed.gif

this is a lot of post for this stupid thing! hope it has been useful